I had a client ask me last week what I think about sport courts.  While pools can limit your audience, when it comes to attracting buyers, sport courts don’t seem to have the same effect.  The reason is that they have a broader range of use, than a pool.  For starters, they are not seasonal; after all, you can shoot hoops or play tennis any time of year.

In addition to year round use, outdoor courts are rare enough to be considered unique, which is attractive to buyers who are looking for something extra. More often then not, selective buyers don’t even know what it is they are looking for.  We then look at a home with a sport court, and they just connect to it.

Unlike pools, sport courts generally don’t require as much maintenance as pools – after all, it can be as simple as a painted slab.  Sure you may have to patch, paint and repair some fencing from time to time, but over all they generally require less effort.

Sport courts vary in size and shape, tennis and basketball are most well known.   I often see courts that offer a more universal appeal with a basketball net and backboard.  Now, a sport court is not going to have any appeal to gardeners.  It may also impede on building an addition where the amount of impervious coverage is limited.  For properties within the McMansion Ordinance the ratio of non-permeable coverage can’t exceed 40% of the lot size.  So, while a sport court may not appeal to everyone, it certainly can offer unique twist to a typical home making standout from the crowd.